Julie Shobe, Clinical Dietitian

Julie Shobe, Clinical Dietitian

Julie Shobe, MS RD LD CDE, Clinical Dietitian

“Vitamin D and physical activity can help improve mood especially during the cold and overcast months. Since the clouds and chilly air are a barrier to getting our vitamin D from the sun, it is especially important to get Vitamin D from food sources which include salmon, tuna, milk, yogurt, sardines, eggs, and fortified ready-to-eat cereal. Also, being intentional about adding movement to your day, whether it is an extra 10 minute walk during lunch or an exercise class at the gym, is sure to help beat the winter blues.”

 

 

CharlotteHarris, NP, Behavioral Health

CharlotteHarris, NP, Behavioral Health

Char Harris, NP, Behavioral Health Services

“If you know you’re prone to a changing mood during the winter, try to prepare ahead of time. Seeing a professional and preparing early on can make you more resistant to the winter blues or even Seasonal Affective Disorder.”

 

 

 

 

Jenni Gaertner, Physical Therapy

Jenni Gaertner, Physical Therapy

Jenni Gaertner, MPT, M.Ed., CIMI, Physical Therapist

“I guess the main thing I do is be religious about my exercise regime, being sure to do something active five to six days per week. I try to get outside as much as possible: bike riding, skiing, snowshoeing, running, or hiking. Even just 30 minutes can help energize and rejuvenate my mind.”

 

 

 

 

Maddy Himmel, RN, Emergency Services

Maddy Himmel, RN, Emergency Services

Maddy Himmel, RN, BSN, Emergency Services

“For me beating the winter blues is all about enjoying this beautiful place we live in. I opt for snowshoeing because it takes the least amount of coordination – that and we don’t see many debilitating snowshoe injuries in the emergency department”